Articles

  • Front-End vs. Back-End Performance

    Front-End vs. Back-End Performance When a visitor hits your site – before the content magically appears in their browser – it must pass through multiple application layers. We sometimes loosely define these layers as the “front-end” and the “back-end”. The front-end consists of HTML, CSS, JS, images, etc. The back-end is the infrastructure and, in some cases, databases and application logic, responsible for serving up data to the user.

  • Capacity Planning (For The Rest Of Us)

    Capacity Planning (For The Rest Of Us) The following is an adaptation of a post from the Loadster blog. Though it reads like a blog post and doesn’t reflect our new-found love for “the enterprise”, you just might find it useful if you’re looking to an intro to capacity planning. Today I heard a term that I used to hear all the time, and haven’t heard at all in the last couple years.

  • Quick and Dirty Performance Tuning

    Quick and Dirty Performance Tuning The following is an adaptation of an older post from the Loadster blog. Poke it with a stick. That’s what most of us do when we come across something new that we don’t understand, right? I usually start performance tuning in pretty much that same way. Just try some stuff and see what happens. Wait! What about non-functional performance requirements? What about tracking and replicating real user behavior?

  • Weighing the Costs of Load Testing

    Weighing the Costs of Load Testing If you want to make sure that whatever testing approach you take generates meaningful results and a positive return on investment, here are a few aspects to consider: Risk Reduction How much is reducing the risk of a site failure actually worth to you? In other words, what would be the cost of lost business (plus embarrassment and brand damage) that could potentially result if your site crashes during a high traffic event?